Justin Cooke

February 11, 2013

Helping others build their online empire is an extremely rewarding activity for us. Many of our best questions come in via email and Joe and I make a point to respond to all of them. The problem is that many of those answers would never see the light of day as they were private replies.

Instead of keeping those answers buried in my email, I thought it might be helpful to share our (expanded) answers here for you as well. Below, you’ll find some of the more common questions we get regarding niche sites, outsourcing, the Philippines, and partnerships.

Do you have any questions you’d like answered? Feel free to leave a comment below, check in with us on Twitter, or contact us directly!

Are Niche Sites Best For A Newbie Like Me To Get Started?

In short…yes. You may have noticed our debate post a while back, Niche Sites Vs. Authority Sites. There were some great arguments made on both sides of the debate and the value authority sites hold isn’t lost on us…but here are a few of the reasons we think that niche sites are the best option if you’re just starting off.

Niche Sites Are Easier

This is especially true if you’re using AdSense. You do your keyword research, buy the domain, setup your theme, and write your content.  Learning how to build niche sites will give you all of the fundamentals you need to build the authority sites later. They don’t require any of the intermediate or advanced skills that are required for authority sites. You can make some mistakes, plod along, and you’ll still find yourself making a bit of money in a couple of months…which leads to our next point.

Fastest Route To Earnings

Authority sites may have more opportunity in the long run, pound-for-pound…but when you’re first starting off you’re wondering whether you’ll be able to make ANY money, not just BIG money. There’s plenty of built-in self-doubt when starting anything new and I think it’s really helpful to start down a path that can prove itself viable awfully quickly.  There’s a bigger concern that, if starting with an authority site, you won’t be able to make it through the 6, 12, or 18 months that are required to start seeing a return that’s worthwhile.  With a niche site, you’re looking at 4-6 months…maybe less.

You Learn The Building Blocks

It’s not like you’ll build niche sites for 6 months, want to switch to ecommerce sites and end up feeling like you haven’t learned anything.  In fact, there’s very little you’ll learn building niche sites that WON’T apply to any other sites you’d like to try out in the future. Whether you decide to switch to authority sites, kindle books, squidoo lenses, directories, etc…all will require the skills you’ll learn building niche sites.  (and then some)

Learning Curve Will Cost You Less

This may apply to both your actual $$ spent as well as your time. Any good poker player knows they spent quite a bit of time and $$ learning the required skills that made them good. If you’re just starting out and looking to learn, you might not want to start out at the high-roller table unless you have a bankroll to support it!

We made plenty of mistakes with our first niche sites.  I think we were a couple weeks and 10 sites in  or so before we realized we were targeting the wrong keywords and building worthless sites…ouch! That would have been a much more painful mistake if it were 10 authority sites and 6-9 months of my time.

Why An Internet Business In The Philippines

We’re often enamored with the Silicon Valley start-ups like Linked-In, Pinterest, and others with their massive, multi-million dollar funding rounds. These companies have great stories, but almost sound mythical for most of us and our plans to start an online business. Are there options for the rest of us? Those that aren’t Silicon Valley heavyweights?

Fortunately, we’ve seen an explosion of information regarding boot-strapped start-ups in recent years. From Tim Ferriss’s 4 Hour Workweek to Chris Guillebeau’s $100 Startup, we’re being shown that it doesn’t always require insider connections or VC funding to take your dream from idea to launch. There is another way.

Davao Island Hopping

We’ve left corporate America, moved to the Philippines, and have started two successful business with plans for more. No, we’re not getting write-ups on TechCrunch and our businesses wouldn’t register with Valley insiders, but we’re making money. Real money. Here are some of the reasons the Philippines might be an answer for your business:

Low Cost Of Living

Outside of the poshest areas in Manila, you’ll find that your monthly living expenses are significantly lower than they might be in the US, UK, Australia, etc. Want a luxury two-bedroom condo with a live-in maid and maid’s quarters? $400-$600 per month. Want a guarded 4-bedroom, 4-bath luxury home with a pool, clubhouse access, etc. that you can use to house a team to build out your project? $800-$1,000 per month. Sick of worrying about the little details (food shopping, cleaning, paying bills, laundry, etc.) instead of building your business? In the Philippines, you can hire a live-in maid or “house manager” that will run your house for around $80-$130 per month. You just can’t beat that…

Amazing Employee Value

Start-ups can be planned out by the founders, but there’s usually a ton of ground work that needs to be done and employees in the Philippines are a great way to get that work done quickly. Depending on your location, you can hire an entry-level data entry employee ($200-400), a mid-level designer ($300-$500), and a mid-level programmer ($500-$800), for significantly less than you can in the West. Another benefit is the English. Young people are taught English in school in the Philippines and it is one of the national languages. (All contracts and legal documents are written in English…a real benefit) You won’t have any problem finding internet-savvy young employees to help you grow your business.

Extended Runway

If you don’t have awesome angel investors or VC cash to play with, figuring out your “runway” (how long you’ll be able to operate and pay your bills while getting your business off the ground) is critical. If you’re willing to put your head down, cut some of the extras, and get to work…you could easily live on $1,500 or even less in the Philippines on your own. That’s key…$18,000 could buy you an entire year of full-time work in getting your project off the ground!

There is some downside, (government bureaucracy, living in a third-world country, etc.) but the overall benefits have been tremendous and critical for us in building our successful overseas business. If you’re considering building a business in the Philippines and for further reading, I would highly suggest checking out Derek Sivers’ Wood Egg project. There’s a book coming out about building a business in the Philippines that we’ve helped create and you’ll likely find useful.

Outsourcing: How Do I Get Started? How Do I Pick The Best People? Any Tips On Hiring?

There seems to be a trend in recent years where authors and bloggers talk about outsourcing as if it were some magic bullet. It’s not. There’s tremendous value when used correctly, but there are a few all-to-common mistakes people make when attempting to outsource their first projects. Here are a few key points:

Know The Process Yourself First

You’ll almost NEVER be able to take an un-established process, send it overseas, and find success. YOU need to be the to determine best practices, test through the process, and make sure you have some defined metrics and a blueprint for success. Hoping you can dream-up a business, send it overseas, and then collect your money just isn’t realistic, no matter what you’ve read.

Lay Out A Step-By-Step Plan

Once you know the process, you need to send them your exact process so that they can follow it exactly. This is usually best accomplished through written directions and/or screenshots or screencasts. As questions come in, considering creating a FAQ’s section that you can send to the next Virtual Assistant you’d like to train and get up to speed. (See: Building Human Machines)

Outsource Specific Skillsets NOT Combinations Of Skillsets

Many web entrepreneurs only want to hire one Virtual Assistant and they want that person to be able to do some copywriting, a bit of design, custom coding, etc. That’s just not realistic. You won’t be able to replace a co-founder’s work with a $300 VA. (You’d have a problem finding someone good at all of those skills in the US at any price…nevermind the Philippines at $300/month!) Instead, look for repetitive, time-consuming tasks that can take up a good amount of time but don’t require a ton of autonomy to complete. Group those tasks by skillsets and find VA’s to help in those specific areas.

Hiring Directly VS. Using An Outsourcing Company

If you’re only looking to hire one or two agents, you’re often better off hiring directly. The larger outsourcing companies would consider that too small to take on and it won’t be worth the time for many mid-sized companies to put much effort into your project. You can find independent VA’s through a company like oDesk directly, but you could also consider using a company like VirtualStaffFinder to save you the time in finding and hiring your VA for a fee. When your project has more complicated needs and processes and a need for 4 or more agents, you may consider using an outsourcing company to manage the project directly. This will save you time in managing the agents directly and provide you better reports, redundancy, etc.

Use Of Easter Eggs

When writing a job description on sites like oDesk, Sulit, etc…considering including “easter eggs” to weed out applicants. This may include something like mentioning “pink unicorns” in their application to including a 200-word writing sample on their favorite sport. There are a ton of potential candidates that blindly apply for jobs without even bothering to read the job description. This will help to weed those agents out and is highly recommended.

How Did The AdSenseFlippers Blog Become An Authority So Quickly?

When we decided to start documenting our niche site creation and monetization process online, I looked around at some of the top bloggers that I admired or respected in the space and put together elements of their business that I thought would go together great with our AdSense Flippers brand. We never knew it would grow to the success we’ve found today, necessarily, but we did incorporate marketing that we knew would help to put us in front of the right audience. Here are a few of the strategies we incorporated in building our blog, podcast, and brand.

Authenticity

The internet is littered with low-level, anonymous bloggers recommending this or that service only to make a buck through an affiliate offer. This type of marketing wreaks of desperation and lacks any authentic connection with their audience. We decided early that, since we already had a successful business that was paying the bills, we didn’t need to “monetize our audience” directly and could instead focus on providing them real value and sharing both our success and failures. We used our real names, our real stories, and didn’t hold anything back when it came to talking about our business. This connected with readers and listeners in a big way and is something we still follow today.

“Be Everywhere”

Your ideal audience likely consumes content in different ways. Some may prefer blog posts while others prefer video. Some may like podcasts while others are big on forums and community. Having a “Be Everywhere” policy allows you to connect with them through the medium of their choosing and there’s no better promoter of the idea than Pat Flynn. He’s presented the idea at BlogWorld and is currently going through the process of writing a book about it, but you can check out SmartPassiveIncome.com to see more about this concept.

Focus On Connecting Instead Of Sales

This concept may be specific to our brand and not to brands in general, so please keep that in mind. Joe and I aren’t terribly great at sales. We understand the concepts, but feel a bit queasy about the hype and pulled-heartstrings that typically come along with selling products, services, etc. Instead, we’ve focused on providing extremely valuable information to our audience and regularly inviting them back to consume that content. While we do offer sites for sale, we’ve realized that by showing people step-by-step how to recreate our process we’ve actually bolstered the authority and trust we have with our audience, making our offers and sites for sale that much more appealing. Sure, there are plenty of people that sell much more directly, but we’ve found that selling around our content has been a great way for non-salesy guys like us to still bring in the cash required to keep the business successful.

Be Disruptive

While there are many positive aspects of other successful bloggers we copied, we also looked for areas we could be disruptive and go against the grain. We noticed that there were a ton of paid ebooks, courses, and membership groups promising to show you how to build niche sites, make a profit, etc. Since we were doing this already, our thought was to simply document our successes and failures for free and to not hold back where others would when it comes to what’s working for us. By not putting our best content behind a paywall, we were able to build an audience much faster than we would have if we had charged for that content. While we might have sold ourselves short in the short-term, the long-term benefit of having an active and engaged audience is tremendous and totally worth it.

What Advice Do You Have On How To Choose The Best Business Partner?

Picking the right business partner is extremely difficult. It’s funny…Joe and I have been in business together for many years and we often recommend to new entrepreneurs that they should NOT bring on a business partner. Instead, you can have limited partnerships on a project-by-project basis, find yourself an accountability partner, etc. We’ve discussed our thoughts on partnerships at some length in our podcasts. For more information, feel free to check out:

Remember that in a 50-50 partnership split, your business has to be twice as successful or more to make it worth it. Otherwise, you’re better off on your own. That being said, Joe and I have had quite a bit of success together so it can’t be that bad, right? :-)

Do you have any questions you’d like us to answer?  Feel free to leave a message in the comments below, reach out on Twitter @empireflippers, or you can use our Contact Us form!


Make a living buying and selling websites
Sign up now to get our best tips, strategies, and case studies
Discussion
Leave a comment
  1. Ollie Smith says:

    Hey Justin, I have a fair amount of experince with building sites and currently have a little spare time, I was going to try and build a few adsense sites. Is this stratergy still viable after EMD, are you guys still building sites? Thanks, appreacitate the ebook and just bought long tail pro from your link. Im in Bali at the moment for a planned month of surfing, but broke my rib after 4 days! Gutted.

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey Ollie,

      We took a hit on the EMD Update (I hate calling it that…there’s nothing inherently wrong with an EMD, of course) and chilled out with our production for a while. We’re back to creating niche sites, but we’ve toned down the on-site seo a bit. We don’t use exact match on the secondaries and instead try to make them even more helpful for users searching for the primary KW.

      Have fun in Bali! Sucks you broke your rib, man…you’ll be back and at ’em soon, I’m sure!

      • Ollie Smith says:

        We lost 3 expensive sites on the 17th Jan this year so know how that feels. Ill let you know how I get on in a few months!

  2. Ollie Smith says:

    Hey Justin, I have a fair amount of experince with building sites and currently have a little spare time, I was going to try and build a few adsense sites. Is this stratergy still viable after EMD, are you guys still building sites? Thanks, appreacitate the ebook and just bought long tail pro from your link. Im in Bali at the moment for a planned month of surfing, but broke my rib after 4 days! Gutted.

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey Ollie,

      We took a hit on the EMD Update (I hate calling it that…there’s nothing inherently wrong with an EMD, of course) and chilled out with our production for a while. We’re back to creating niche sites, but we’ve toned down the on-site seo a bit. We don’t use exact match on the secondaries and instead try to make them even more helpful for users searching for the primary KW.

      Have fun in Bali! Sucks you broke your rib, man…you’ll be back and at ’em soon, I’m sure!

      • Ollie Smith says:

        We lost 3 expensive sites on the 17th Jan this year so know how that feels. Ill let you know how I get on in a few months!

  3. Kevin says:

    Nice article! Quick question – Lets say I have 5 pages for my new niche site written up. Do I post them all in one day or spread the postings throughout the week(s)? Thanks

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Kevin…

      Go ahead and post them all in one day…no reason or need to drip feed at that level. I think drip feeding has its place on large, multiple-author authority sites, but not in this case.

    • Randy says:

      Posting those 5 pages for your new site is probably a good move because it gives the search engines more content to evaluate, to understand what your topic is about. Your pages will probably be indexed quicker.

  4. Kevin says:

    Nice article! Quick question – Lets say I have 5 pages for my new niche site written up. Do I post them all in one day or spread the postings throughout the week(s)? Thanks

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Kevin…

      Go ahead and post them all in one day…no reason or need to drip feed at that level. I think drip feeding has its place on large, multiple-author authority sites, but not in this case.

    • Randy says:

      Posting those 5 pages for your new site is probably a good move because it gives the search engines more content to evaluate, to understand what your topic is about. Your pages will probably be indexed quicker.

  5. Didn’t realize you are in the Philippines, Justin; sounds like a great solution for an independent business like yours.

    I am currently created “systems and processes” to outsource some of the mandane tasks that eat up so much of my day. Look forward to getting that off my plate. :)

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Ana!

      It is quite useful. Required for us, really…our main “business” is an outsourcing company that we run from here.

      That’s great you’re documenting your process…it makes it SO much easier to transition your work to others. We wrote about this recently…how to create “Standard Operating Procedures” for businesses like ours. Check the post out here:

      http://outsourcingforstartups.com/standard-operating-procedures/

  6. Didn’t realize you are in the Philippines, Justin; sounds like a great solution for an independent business like yours.

    I am currently created “systems and processes” to outsource some of the mandane tasks that eat up so much of my day. Look forward to getting that off my plate. :)

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Ana!

      It is quite useful. Required for us, really…our main “business” is an outsourcing company that we run from here.

      That’s great you’re documenting your process…it makes it SO much easier to transition your work to others. We wrote about this recently…how to create “Standard Operating Procedures” for businesses like ours. Check the post out here:

      http://outsourcingforstartups.com/standard-operating-procedures/

  7. Yakezie says:

    Makes a lot of sense to move out to The Philippines. Do you guys make more from your day jobs or online business?

    Is there a January income report that I missed? Thanks, Sam

    • It was about 50/50 in total for 2012, but our day jobs (outsourcing through TryBPO) took on a larger percentage of income in recent months as we didn’t sell as many sites as we normally do here at AdSenseFlippers.com. That should change with some big events coming up in 2013. Stay tuned.

      • Yakezie says:

        Cool. Looking forward to your January and February income reports and the ways you guys are adapting to Google. Looks like another recent Smackdown end of February.
        Sam

  8. Yakezie says:

    Makes a lot of sense to move out to The Philippines. Do you guys make more from your day jobs or online business?

    Is there a January income report that I missed? Thanks, Sam

    • It was about 50/50 in total for 2012, but our day jobs (outsourcing through TryBPO) took on a larger percentage of income in recent months as we didn’t sell as many sites as we normally do here at AdSenseFlippers.com. That should change with some big events coming up in 2013. Stay tuned.

      • Yakezie says:

        Cool. Looking forward to your January and February income reports and the ways you guys are adapting to Google. Looks like another recent Smackdown end of February.
        Sam

  9. […] VC funding to take your dream from idea to launch. There is another way… Read the full article on making a living _in_ the Philippines but not _from_ the Philippines.  […]

  10. Hey guys

    A lot of great content there and many solid answers. thanks for sharing.

    BTW could you loan me the $18K fro my next runway? Furniture for Dolphins :-) got to be a market.. right ? After all cat furniture sells :-)

  11. Hey guys

    A lot of great content there and many solid answers. thanks for sharing.

    BTW could you loan me the $18K fro my next runway? Furniture for Dolphins :-) got to be a market.. right ? After all cat furniture sells :-)

  12. virtualend says:

    Another nice post! I always love reading about how others have adapted to life in the Philippines, as well as starting up businesses here… mainly because I have been going through it myself! In my case, I did it a bit backwards from most “entrepreneur” types, or the ExPat retirees… but I’m sure I’m not alone.

    In my case, I met and fell in love with a wonderful lady online, and I wanted to be with her even if it meant moving half way around the world. The process of getting her Visa to come to the USA was much too long, and frequent visits would cost way more then I could afford.

    So for me… working online enabled me the option of simply pulling up roots and moving to the Philippines. By expanding my web site business through Adsense & affiliate marketing, I realized that I can do my work anywhere with an internet connection. Since I’ve already gone the entrepreneur route for several years… I do not fall into the “retiree” catagory – since I have no pension to sustain me.

    I had not been here long when I discovered the Adsense Flippers podcast, and I was intrigued by the niche web site and flipping opportunities you practice and teach… but also by the fact that it was hosted by a couple of fellow Americans less then an hour away from me!

    I’ve been learning all I can from your podcasts and posts, and it was great to meet you in person as well! I am also a big fan of Pat Flynn at Smart Passive Income, and enjoy following Dan & Ian’s Lifestyle Business Podcast as well.

    I’ve began building some niche web sites, and getting ready to get my feet wet at flipping a couple soon… while still keeping fairly busy with my hobby business web sites. I’m hoping that by growing the niche web sites, it will soon provide me the means to build a house, travel, and enjoy the lifestyle here in the Philippines with my honey! :)

    P.S – I would love to get together with you guys again sometime soon – if not just to grab a San Miguel or Tanduay Ice and shoot the bull! The one drawback to living in such a small town as Panabo is the absence of other Americans to hang out with!

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Would love to meet up again…just let us know when you’ll be heading out to Davao again and we’ll set something up. We (usually) have a night where we go for dinner/drinks as a part of the “Davao Social Club” :-) Hope you can join us sometime!

  13. virtualend says:

    Another nice post! I always love reading about how others have adapted to life in the Philippines, as well as starting up businesses here… mainly because I have been going through it myself! In my case, I did it a bit backwards from most “entrepreneur” types, or the ExPat retirees… but I’m sure I’m not alone.

    In my case, I met and fell in love with a wonderful lady online, and I wanted to be with her even if it meant moving half way around the world. The process of getting her Visa to come to the USA was much too long, and frequent visits would cost way more then I could afford.

    So for me… working online enabled me the option of simply pulling up roots and moving to the Philippines. By expanding my web site business through Adsense & affiliate marketing, I realized that I can do my work anywhere with an internet connection.

    I had not been here long when I discovered the Adsense Flippers podcast, and I was intrigued by the niche web site and flipping opportunities you practice and teach… but also by the fact that it was hosted by a couple of fellow Americans less then an hour away from me!

    I’ve been learning all I can from your podcasts and posts, and it was great to meet you in person as well! I am also a big fan of Pat Flynn at Smart Passive Income, and enjoy following Dan & Ian’s Lifestyle Business Podcast as well.

    I’ve began building some niche web sites, and getting ready to get my feet wet at flipping a couple soon… while still keeping fairly busy with my hobby business web sites. I’m hoping that by growing the niche web sites, it will soon provide me the means to build a house, travel, and enjoy the lifestyle here in the Philippines with my honey! :)

    P.S – I would love to get together with you guys again sometime soon – if not just to grab a San Miguel or Tanduay Ice and shoot the bull! The one drawback to living in such a small town as Panabo is the absence of other Americans to hang out with!

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Would love to meet up again…just let us know when you’ll be heading out to Davao again and we’ll set something up. We (usually) have a night where we go for dinner/drinks as a part of the “Davao Social Club” :-) Hope you can join us sometime!

  14. Awesome stuff, loved this one. Gotta chime in on the Philippines outsourcing thing…. it’s definitely a skillset learning how to hire, who to hire and how to get the best from the workers. I’ve had outsource workers who completely sucked / drove me crazy / showed themselves to be flakes within an hour, and I’ve had some who are total ninjas worth their weight in gold. Attitude is everything, watch closely for signs of the ones who are made of the right stuff. Also, learn & use the right tools of the trade. Skype chat, screenshare, google drive etc.

    Be prepared to put some energy into finding the right people… also the right people know the right people, so once you have found someone solid, ask them if they know anyone else who is amazing.

    I’m currently having great success creating shared google drive spreadsheets for each web site with columns for “article done”, “image added”, “proof read”, “amazon ads added” etc…. the whole team can see the process unfolding and the project can be viewed at a glance. Be prepared to create processes and systems for things so that once you have taught it once, it then becomes automated… to the point where you can literally say “ok I am creating a new web site on __________ and you can get the whole thing put together according to the formula, SEO done, Facebook done…. etc… but as you said… you have to have done it first :)

    • Love this Alex! Just shows that tracking and reporting has another benefit — internal metrics make the team not only know where they are weak and strong, but allows them to compete against each other in a positive way. I have become a bit of a spreadsheet ninja making it easy for agents to track their work, but reports to be fairly complex.

  15. Awesome stuff, loved this one. Gotta chime in on the Philippines outsourcing thing…. it’s definitely a skillset learning how to hire, who to hire and how to get the best from the workers. I’ve had outsource workers who completely sucked / drove me crazy / showed themselves to be flakes within an hour, and I’ve had some who are total ninjas worth their weight in gold. Attitude is everything, watch closely for signs of the ones who are made of the right stuff. Also, learn & use the right tools of the trade. Skype chat, screenshare, google drive etc.

    Be prepared to put some energy into finding the right people… also the right people know the right people, so once you have found someone solid, ask them if they know anyone else who is amazing.

    I’m currently having great success creating shared google drive spreadsheets for each web site with columns for “article done”, “image added”, “proof read”, “amazon ads added” etc…. the whole team can see the process unfolding and the project can be viewed at a glance. Be prepared to create processes and systems for things so that once you have taught it once, it then becomes automated… to the point where you can literally say “ok I am creating a new web site on __________ and you can get the whole thing put together according to the formula, SEO done, Facebook done…. etc… but as you said… you have to have done it first :)

    • Love this Alex! Just shows that tracking and reporting has another benefit — internal metrics make the team not only know where they are weak and strong, but allows them to compete against each other in a positive way. I have become a bit of a spreadsheet ninja making it easy for agents to track their work, but reports to be fairly complex.

  16. Dave Starr says:

    Wow, three big articles in one here, to my way of thinking. In particular I lived the section on “Why the Philippines” for starting an online business. I’ve also written extensively on these issues in my “Economy Birding in the Philippines” series. Living in the Philippines (and earning from the rest of the world) is _NOT_ just for old retired folk like me.

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Dave!

      Years ago I made the mistake in thinking that expats were either filthy rich, older retirees, or young backpackers. I never realized that there may be younger or middle-aged business owners that chose and could afford this lifestyle, but as we meet more and more of them I see that to be true.

      The world is changing and this type of lifestyle is definitely becoming more mainstream. I wonder how far this trend will go? :-)

  17. Dave Starr says:

    Wow, three big articles in one here, to my way of thinking. In particular I lived the section on “Why the Philippines” for starting an online business. I’ve also written extensively on these issues in my “Economy Birding in the Philippines” series. Living in the Philippines (and earning from the rest of the world) is _NOT_ just for old retired folk like me.

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Hey, Dave!

      Years ago I made the mistake in thinking that expats were either filthy rich, older retirees, or young backpackers. I never realized that there may be younger or middle-aged business owners that chose and could afford this lifestyle, but as we meet more and more of them I see that to be true.

      The world is changing and this type of lifestyle is definitely becoming more mainstream. I wonder how far this trend will go? :-)

  18. Brilliant as always. guys. Being online and creating a business, opens up so many opportunities

  19. Darren Boland says:

    Brilliant as always. guys. Being online and creating a business, opens up so many opportunities

  20. nichedelivery says:

    One of the best posts on this site. Thanks!

  21. nichedelivery says:

    One of the best posts on this site. Thanks!

  22. Brian says:

    great blog post, a lot of questions answered. Hey do you guys know whether or not Google authorship makes a big difference in your search engine performance?

    • Justin Cooke says:

      I doubt it makes any difference in your rankings on the SERP, but I bet it makes a noticeable difference on your CTR to your site. More authority compared to those around you.

  23. Brian says:

    great blog post, a lot of questions answered. Hey do you guys know whether or not Google authorship makes a big difference in your search engine performance?

    • Justin Cooke says:

      I doubt it makes any difference in your rankings on the SERP, but I bet it makes a noticeable difference on your CTR to your site. More authority compared to those around you.

  24. Melody Hill says:

    How long does it take to make a solid niche site on average? You made it sound like a few weeks, as opposed to 6 months? I finally decided to jump in, and try one. It’s taken a while and I don’t know what I’m doing but at least I decided to stop stalling because of anxiety. Don’t know if it’ll pan out, and writing content takes a lot of work, but I’ll learn from it. It’s a lot of work, I don’t know how you churn them out, I also can never find topics, even though there are supposedly a lot.

  25. Melody Hill says:

    How long does it take to make a solid niche site on average? You made it sound like a few weeks, as opposed to 6 months? I finally decided to jump in, and try one. It’s taken a while and I don’t know what I’m doing but at least I decided to stop stalling because of anxiety. Don’t know if it’ll pan out, and writing content takes a lot of work, but I’ll learn from it. It’s a lot of work, I don’t know how you churn them out, I also can never find topics, even though there are supposedly a lot.

  26. aliseselezneva says:

    Living in Philippines: sounds like a heaven ;))

  27. aliseselezneva says:

    Living in Philippines: sounds like a heaven ;))

  28. Andy Hayes says:

    Great post, guys. Glad to see you back in my feed. :-)

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Thanks, Andy…nice to be back as well! :-)

      We should talk soon. I’d love to discuss our plan with you regarding our up-and-coming projects and maybe get you on a podcast episode. :-)

      • Andy Hayes says:

        ;-) Would love to. You know where to find me. (Well, right know I’ll be in the kitchen having breakfast, but afterwards…lol.)

  29. Andy Hayes says:

    Great post, guys. Glad to see you back in my feed. :-)

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Thanks, Andy…nice to be back as well! :-)

      We should talk soon. I’d love to discuss our plan with you regarding our up-and-coming projects and maybe get you on a podcast episode. :-)

      • Andy Hayes says:

        ;-) Would love to. You know where to find me. (Well, right know I’ll be in the kitchen having breakfast, but afterwards…lol.)

  30. Hi guys .

    That was 4 articles in one ! Excellent piece , answers a lot of questions .

    I am staring a new business with a partner . I do all the things she can’t do and she does all the things I can’t do . Works well for the time being .

    Be healthy and smile .

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Thanks, Ilias!

      Playing to each other’s strengths (and covering each other’s weaknesses) can definitely be helpful in a partnership. That’s a thing that Joe and I have, for sure.

      Best of luck with the new venture…you’ll have to let us know what it is, how it’s going, etc.!

      • Thank you Justin . It’s a store that sells greek traditional sweets . Now we’re struggling with the beaurocracy. I think you can relate to that :) . I’ll keep you posted .
        Have a nice day .

  31. Hi guys .

    That was 4 articles in one ! Excellent piece , answers a lot of questions .

    I am staring a new business with a partner . I do all the things she can’t do and she does all the things I can’t do . Works well for the time being .

    Be healthy and smile .

    • JustinWCooke says:

      Thanks, Ilias!

      Playing to each other’s strengths (and covering each other’s weaknesses) can definitely be helpful in a partnership. That’s a thing that Joe and I have, for sure.

      Best of luck with the new venture…you’ll have to let us know what it is, how it’s going, etc.!

      • Thank you Justin . It’s a store that sells greek traditional sweets . Now we’re struggling with the beaurocracy. I think you can relate to that :) . I’ll keep you posted .
        Have a nice day .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Have a site to sell?
Sell Your Site

Click here to find out how much your website is worth